WHAT’S AHEAD: THE VIEW FROM ROUTH STREET

APRIL 27, 9:30 AM – 4:30 PM, Reception at 8:30 AM
Featuring: Dallas Institute Fellows

A Dallas Institute Fellows Symposium

Renowned urban thinker and Dallas Institute Fellow Jane Jacobs died in 2006, a few days before her 90th birthday. In 2004 she published her final book, Dark Age Ahead, in which she argued that “we show signs of rushing headlong into a Dark Age.” Suffused with prophecy, Jacobs’ last public utterance warned that “a Dark Age is a culture’s dead end,” marked by “mass amnesia in which even the memory of what was lost was also lost.” Following an exploration of the book, Institute Fellows found themselves divided: is Jacobs’ ominous prediction likely, or does she overstate the case? What is the future of our culture as viewed from Routh Street, where Institute Fellows gather? This Symposium will proceed from Jacobs’ conclusion that self-awareness is the necessary foundation of a vigorous culture; presentations by Fellows will consist of excursions into various regions of contemporary culture, with ample discussion to follow each one.

The Fellows of the Dallas Institute are an invited and distinguished group of scholars, teachers, writers, and public intellectuals in the arts and humanities, residing in Dallas and other states and around the world.

 

Dr. Bainard Cowan holds the Cowan Chair in Literature at the University of Dallas. A Yale Ph.D., Dr. Cowan came to UD from Louisiana State University, where he was Professor of Literature. He is the author of Exiled Waters: Moby Dick and the Crisis of Allegory and has edited four books, including Poetics of the Americas.

 

 

 

Dr. Robert S. Dupree is Professor of English at the University of Dallas and former Director of Library and University Research. He is proficient in several languages and is a recognized authority on literary theory and the literary genres. He holds a B.A. from the University of Dallas and the M.A. and Ph.D. from Yale University.

 

 

 

Dr. Randy Gordon is a Founding Partner of Barnes & Thornburg LLP’s Dallas office and Executive Professor of Law and History at Texas A&M University. He is a prolific writer and frequent lecturer. Among his publications are Rehumanizing Law: A Theory of Law and Democracy and numerous book chapters and journal articles across the U.S. and beyond.

 

 

 

Joshua Parens received his BA from St. John’s College and his MA and PhD from the University of Chicago. He is Professor of Philosophy and Dean of the Braniff Graduate School of Liberal Arts at the University of Dallas. In addition to philosophers on whom he has published, he currently has writing projects on Bacon, Descartes, Montesquieu, and Heidegger.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Robert Romanyshyn is an Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute. Author of eight books including his forthcoming Victor Frankenstein, the Monster and the Shadows of Technology: The Frankenstein Prophecies, he has published numerous essays in psychological, philosophical, literary, and education journals.

 

 

 

Dr. Joanne Stroud is a Founding Fellow of the Dallas Institute, Director of Institute Publications, Editor of the Gaston Bachelard Translation Series, and Founder at the Dallas Institute of the annual James Hillman Symposium. She is author of The Bonding of Will and Desire, among numerous other publications.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Gail Thomas is a Founding Fellow of the Dallas Institute and creator of its Center for the City. Thomas served as the Institute’s Founding Director for eighteen years and has been a strong advocate of the active presence of the humanities in the life of the city. She has taught at the Dallas Institute, Schumacher College in the UK, and the University of Dallas.

 

 

 

Prof. Mary Vernon is former Professor of Art and Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor at SMU, from which she recently retired. She is represented by Valley House Gallery of Dallas and will have two local exhibitions in the fall. She will also receive the Dallas Historical Society Award for Excellence in Community Service (in the Creative category) in November.

 

 

 

 

 

Admission: $60; $50 for Members; $20 for Educator Members
Includes continental breakfast; lunch on your own