The Annual James Hillman Symposium

Hillman Page Banner

Enrich your knowledge of the myths underlying Western culture:

“Besides our aim of tying a human mess to a wider myth, we are also attempting to connect present experience to historical culture, hoping to open a long closed door, . . . attempting to show how antiquity can be relevant to the life of the psyche and how psychic life can vivify antiquity.”

-James Hillman, Mythic Figures

The sixth annual James Hillman Symposium, 27-28 October, provides a window into the fascinating mind of James Hillman, a Founding Fellow of the Dallas Institute and world-renowned psychologist. More than a dozen internationally known experts in archetypal psychology will explore the Olympians, the Titans, and other legendary figures in talks, breakout sessions, and informal conversations with participants. The featured book this year is Hillman’s epic work: Mythic Figures, volume 6.1 of the Uniform Edition of the Writings of James Hillman co-published by Spring Publications and the Dallas Institute, edited by Dr. Joanne Stroud, Director of Publications for the Dallas Institute.

Your registration fee includes an intimate dinner with speakers on Friday evening, continental breakfast and working lunch on Saturday, and a celebration reception to cap off the weekend on Saturday evening.

Friday and Saturday, October 27 and 28
$125 members, $145 nonmembers, $35 teachers, $20 students
Registration


About James Hillman

Founding Fellow James Hillman was instrumental in the creation of the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture, which still resonates with his influence. Hillman’s contributions to the humanities were many and profound, none more remarkable than his formulation of Archetypal Psychology, which he named in 1970 and focused his work upon until his death in 2011. To honor Hillman, the Institute initiated in 2012 this annual program aimed at exploring the rich depths of his lifelong study of—in his own words, a “psychology deliberately affiliated with the arts, culture, and the history of ideas, arising as they do from the imagination.”

Hillman studied with the great Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung in the 1950s and later became the first director of studies at the Jung Institute in Zurich. After returning to the United States in 1980, he taught at Yale, Syracuse, and the universities of Chicago and Dallas. He also became editor of Spring Publications, a small Texas press devoted to the work of contemporary psychologists. Hillman authored some twenty books of his own.

In spite of these achievements, Hillman was hardly an establishment figure in the world of psychology. If anything, he was looked upon by many in the profession as a profoundly subversive thinker, a thorn in the side of respectable psychologists.

As the founder of archetypal psychology—a school of thought aimed at “re-visioning” or “reimagining” psychology—Hillman argued that the therapy business needs to evolve beyond reductionist “nature” and “nurture” theories of human development.

Interested in receiving information about future James Hillman Symposia? Join the email list here!


Past symposia

Founding Fellow James Hillman was instrumental in the creation of the Dallas Institute, which still resonates with his influence. Hillman’s contributions to culture were many and profound, none more remarkable than his formulation of Archetypal Psychology, which he named in 1970 and focused his work upon until his death in 2011. To honor and continue to learn from Hillman, the Institute initiated in 2012 this annual program aimed at exploring the rich depths of his lifelong study—in his own words, a “psychology deliberately affiliated with the arts, culture, and the history of ideas, arising as they do from the imagination.”

  • © 2016 Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture - Contact Us - Admin Login -